15.5.15

Mini Review: The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton

The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton

Goodreads • BookDeposity • Published on January 1st 2014 by Ecco
My Love: ♥♥♥♥♥

As a fan of Magical Realism, when I saw The Miniaturist at the store I had to read it. Though it's score is low in Goodreads at the moment, this historical fiction was one of a kind. It deals with the power to create the life you desire, the sacrifices which need to be made and the prejudice of the era. Having lived in Amsterdam for a year, I could clearly picture this book. It is not a book for everybody. But it has a special place in my heart. Nella grows into a woman in a short time and the tragedy of her life makes you feel life is unfair. It is magical and enchanting. The prose is like reading a dream, never dull and always moving. I found myself wishing for a plot twist just to have things ending differently, but it was not the case. Such was life back then. Not everyone will understand this book, but those who do will love it.

I love you. I love you. From back to front, I love you.


Mini reviews are books I read long ago but never wrote about. Still I want to recommend them in this feature.

9.5.15

Book Review: The Gracekeepers by by Kirsty Logan


The Gracekeepers

Kirsty Logan

Published April 23rd 2015 by Crown  • 3.86 of 5 stars at Goodreads

As a Gracekeeper, Callanish administers shoreside burials, sending the dead to their final resting place deep in the depths of the ocean. Alone on her island, she has exiled herself to a life of tending watery graves as penance for a long-ago mistake that still haunts her. Meanwhile, North works as a circus performer with the Excalibur, a floating troupe of acrobats, clowns, dancers, and trainers who sail from one archipelago to the next, entertaining in exchange for sustenance.
In a world divided between those inhabiting the mainland ("landlockers") and those who float on the sea ("damplings"), loneliness has become a way of life for North and Callanish, until a sudden storm offshore brings change to both their lives--offering them a new understanding of the world they live in and the consequences of the past, while restoring hope in an unexpected future.
Inspired in part by Scottish myths and fairytales, The Gracekeepers tells a modern story of an irreparably changed world: one that harbors the same isolation and sadness, but also joys and marvels of our own age.


This is a review copy I received from Edelweiss for honest feedback. I decided to limit my ARC request to only those books that make me eager to read them and not just to find what to read. This was the case with The Gracekeepers. Loved the summary and it was compared to The Night Circus and The Age of Miracles. Both books I love. I was searching for new contemporary magical realism books when I found this one. After a week or two I had it approved for a review. YAY! So here it is!

4.5.15

Book Review: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel


Station Eleven

Emily St. John Mandel

Published January 1st 2014 by Knopf  • 4.01 of 5 stars at Goodreads

The poverty stricken Reds are commoners, living under the rule of the Silvers, elite warriors with god-like powers.

To Mare Barrow, a 17-year-old Red girl from The Stilts, it looks like nothing will ever change.

Mare finds herself working in the Silver Palace, at the center of those she hates the most. She quickly discovers that, despite her red blood, she possesses a deadly power of her own. One that threatens to destroy Silver control. But power is a dangerous game. And in this world divided by blood, who will win?


Once in a while you encounter a book that makes you think. Sucks you into it's words and touch your soul and makes you consider the questions of life. Such was a book last year with A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki. This year, it was Station Eleven, as of now. Who knows by the end of the year. But this is a book which makes you think about what it means to reach immortality in a dying world.

3.5.15

Book Review: Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard




Red Queen

Victoria Aveyard

Published February 10th 2015 by Orion
4.15 of 5 stars at Goodreads

The poverty stricken Reds are commoners, living under the rule of the Silvers, elite warriors with god-like powers.

To Mare Barrow, a 17-year-old Red girl from The Stilts, it looks like nothing will ever change.

Mare finds herself working in the Silver Palace, at the center of those she hates the most. She quickly discovers that, despite her red blood, she possesses a deadly power of her own. One that threatens to destroy Silver control. But power is a dangerous game. And in this world divided by blood, who will win?

I got this book on my way to NYC for holidays. I was going to wait for next year but as soon as I saw it I had to have it. My instinct is usually right when it comes to buying books compulsively. This time as well. I was expecting something entirely different. This novel was filled with political and conspiracy plots. More than just about division of races. More than just love triangles. I lived and loved every page. I was afraid of the hype, but it did not let me down.